3 Reasons To Slow Down The ‘Hustle’

 

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A couple of weeks ago I went on a little trip away to one of my favourite places in the country, and my god was it good.

At first, I was so excited just to relax. Then I got a bit of a niggling, guilty feeling, like for a couple of days I was being totally unproductive if I just relaxed and did nothing else.

I realise that’s irrational and I even wrote a post all about an overthinker’s guide to a relaxing holiday, but still, I also realised it was because for a brief moment, I wasn’t ‘hustling.’

There’s this major ‘girl boss,’ ‘get it girl,’ ‘hustle all day every day’ mentality going around at the moment (well, for the past couple of years really), and jesus, it’s tiring.

So what happens if we want to take a break? Are we not reaching our goals if we’re not hustling all the time? Can we even reach our goals if we don’t hustle? What about working hard, but also having balance? All of these thoughts were kind of twirling around in my head. So I came up with 3 reasons to slow down the hustle:

 


 
 
 
 
 
 

It’ll catch up to you eventually. 

Work hard, go for everything you want in life and don’t compromise on that. But hustling?  That’s a whole different beast. To me it’s presented as this “work yourself to the bone, go, go go” mentality that quite frankly I don’t think hardly any of us can live up to. So like mice on a wheel, we try and be girl bosses and chase our dreams and we go and we go and we go. And then? We get tired. We burn out. It all catches up eventually and before you know it you’ve hit a slump where you’re laying on the couch talking to your best friend wondering what the hell is the point of it all (#beenthere.)

 

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Quality over quantity. 

Something that comes along with hustling is being productive. I’ll give it that. The thing is, I’ll usually focus on getting more things done, but that doesn’t mean that what I’m doing is necessarily any good. I’ve just gotten more done. But you know what? I’d get to the end of the day and be like “dayyyyum girl, you hustled.” Then other days I could get only 1 thing ticked off of my to-do list, and then I feel like shit because I feel like I didn’t really hustle or get much done. What makes one better than the other? My stupid millennial-style brain, that’s the only difference. In defence of slowing down the hustle is the quality of what you can get done, rather than just being focused on doing as much as you possibly can and jam-packing your time.

 

There has to be another way.

It seems like as of 2019, if you’re not actively hustling, you’re not going to reach your goals. Well damn Jackie (imagine that said in Kelso’s voice), I disagree. Before the term ‘hustle’ was even invented, plenty of people still managed to hit their goals and reach their dreams, make it to Narnia and all that jazz. So it’s possible, it’s definitely possible. It’s just that now with social media and the massive amount of over-sharing that we all do, we’re comparing ourselves to others and it feels like no matter what we do we’re never quite productive enough, never quite hustling enough.

 

 

So here’s to all of us that may like a slightly quieter life. We still want to (and will) work extremely hard, but we’re also not going to feel guilty about taking it easy sometimes, because, opposing what most people try and tell us nowadays, life actually ain’t all about that hustle.